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Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint’s Tap Water for the Next Month

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint’s Tap Water for the Next Month


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Snyder, who has faced repeated calls to resign over his mishandling of the crisis, will drink Flint water for the next month

The lead poisoning crisis that has plagued Flint since at least 2014 has left residents afraid to drink or shower in their homes.

Responding to months of anger over his mishandling of the Flint water crisis, Michigan governor Rick Snyder announced that he would be drinking the city’s filtered tap water for at least the next month, as well as cooking with it.

In 2014, as a temporary cost-cutting measure, the city switched from the Detroit water system and began sourcing water from the Flint River. The decision was made without planning for corrosion control, which would have prevented lead from old pipes to enter the water, and thus the water from the Flint River effectively poisoned its residents, particularly children, who faced the greatest risk.

Experts have warned that Flint’s youngest will face inevitable health problems, including developmental disabilities, for years to come.

Karen Weaver, the mayor of Flint, declared a state of emergency for the city in December, a full month before Snyder responded to the crisis. Snyder has faced heavy criticism over his delayed response to the crisis, as well as calls for his resignation from constituents and national figures alike, including documentarian and Flint native Michael Moore and Democratic nominee Bernie Sanders.

Earlier this year, a review of the 500 largest public water systems in the United States also found that Flint residents pay the highest water rates in the country — approximately $864 a year, more than three times what is paid by residents in nearby Detroit.

On Monday, Snyder took home five jugs of filtered tap water from Flint, and said that he would refill his supply during subsequent visits in an effort to “alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust” that has made many locals afraid to touch the water, despite the distribution of filters.

“Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request,” Snyder said in a statement.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Drink Flint Water for 30 Days

DETROIT (Reuters) - Michigan Governor Rick Snyder, under pressure to resign over the state's poor handling of a lead water crisis in Flint, promised on Monday that he will drink filtered tap water from the city for at least the next 30 days to show that it is safe.

Snyder visited Flint residents on Monday, including one homeowner whose drinking water has tested higher than federal safety standards for the toxic substance and who has expressed concern about drinking even filtered water.

The governor goes to Flint about once a week from the state capital Lansing about 50 miles away and water would be delivered to him by other state officials after their visits the rest of the time, said Ari Adler, Snyder's spokesman.

"I completely understand why some Flint residents are hesitant to drink the water and I am hopeful I can alleviate some of the skepticism and mistrust by putting words to action," Snyder said in a statement.

"Flint residents made it clear that they would like to see me personally drink the water, so today I am fulfilling that request," he said. He said he would drink Flint water at work and at home.

Michigan officials have been criticized for the lead water crisis, which became a national scandal and also drew attention to other cities with potentially toxic water.

Under the direction of a state-appointed emergency manager, Flint switched water supplies to the Flint River from Detroit's system in 2014 to save money.

The corrosive river water leached lead, a toxic substance that can damage the nervous system, from the city's water pipes. Flint switched back to the Detroit system last October.

Water experts have said Flint's water is safe to drink as long as residents are using up-to-date filters and more recently have said the system would not recover until heavy water usage by residents results in the flushing out of lead particles from the system.

Several Democratic members of the U.S. House of Representatives last month called on Snyder, a Republican, to resign. Snyder has said he will not step down.

Michigan this month extended the state of emergency in Flint by four months, enabling the city to tap more state funds and coordinate a response to the crisis with other authorities. State officials and water experts also have proposed the state adopt what would be the strictest lead testing standards in the United States.


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